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Irish feast day or American drinking game?

Shammed! The origin of many holidays we know and love have been lost overtime. Makayla Sims, Meridian senior, says,

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Shammed! The origin of many holidays we know and love have been lost overtime. Makayla Sims, Meridian senior, says, "My family doesn't normally celebrate Saint Patrick's Day, but at least we know the reason why others celebrate the holiday now."

Lydia Wiggins, Reporter

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What comes to mind when you hear Saint Patrick’s Day? Leprechauns, or four-leaf clovers? Many of the Saint Patrick’s Day normalities you know and love are incorrect. You’ll be surprised to hear that this holiday is almost 100% driven by religion and not by beer and house parties.

The pinching that follows if you’re caught not wearing green is actually an American tradition that dates back to the 1700’s. The tradition is that a leprechaun will pinch you if you’re not wearing green.

The native three-leafed clover we often associate with luck was actually what the saint used to describe the holy trinity, or more formally known as the father, the son, and the holy spirit. According to an article on History.com the first recorded Saint Patrick’s Day parade was actually held in the US by Irish soldiers serving in the British military.

When the Irish started to migrate to the US to avoid starvation during the potato famine, it was hard for them to fit in and find jobs due to their alien religious beliefs and poor education. According to an article on History.com when the Irish Americans first took the streets to celebrate their holiday, the US newspapers portrayed them in cartoons as “drunk, violent monkeys.”

This Irish holiday is named after a patron saint who was born in Britain but was kidnapped at the age of sixteen to be forced into servitude. He later escaped and returned to Ireland and was known for bringing Christianity to the population.

Saint Patrick’s Day is a Christian holiday which takes place during the season of Lent; as a tradition, Irish families attend church in the morning and celebrate in the evening. The rules of Lent would be forgotten for a day and families would feast on meat, dance, and drink.

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Irish feast day or American drinking game?