Fifth hour, Honors English 2’s love affair with patriotism

Students+in+Sheila+Moore%27s+fifth+hour+Honors+English+2+class+stand+and+sing+the+Fergie+version+of+the+National+Anthem+during+fifth+hour.+%22I+think+it%27s+a+great+way+for+this+group+to+be+themselves%2C%22+said+Moore.
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Fifth hour, Honors English 2’s love affair with patriotism

Students in Sheila Moore's fifth hour Honors English 2 class stand and sing the Fergie version of the National Anthem during fifth hour.

Students in Sheila Moore's fifth hour Honors English 2 class stand and sing the Fergie version of the National Anthem during fifth hour. "I think it's a great way for this group to be themselves," said Moore.

Delaney Jones

Students in Sheila Moore's fifth hour Honors English 2 class stand and sing the Fergie version of the National Anthem during fifth hour. "I think it's a great way for this group to be themselves," said Moore.

Delaney Jones

Delaney Jones

Students in Sheila Moore's fifth hour Honors English 2 class stand and sing the Fergie version of the National Anthem during fifth hour. "I think it's a great way for this group to be themselves," said Moore.

Delaney Jones, Reporter

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Almost every day at 11:32 a.m. in Sheila Moore’s classroom, the Pledge of Allegiance or National Anthem can be heard. Students in fifth hour Honors English 2 are all too happy to speak/sing loud enough for anyone in the vicinity to hear. While it can be funny to hear, it is an important way for students in this class to express their patriotism.

Many students in fifth hour Honors English 2 have physical education first hour. They can not hear anything over the intercom in the locker rooms which causes them to miss out on saying the Pledge of Allegiance with everyone else at the beginning of first hour.

“At the beginning of the school year, we were talking about saying the pledge. Several of my students were upset they didn’t get to do the pledge in first hour,” said Moore. “We decided as a group to do it in fifth hour so they could have the experience.”

Moore often opens the door so others can hear the class and join in if they want to. They enjoy bringing smiles to the faces of people in the hallway that hear them.

“I think it’s kind of funny that they just do it out of random sometimes, but it’s also kind of annoying if you’re doing something,” said Haylee Wilson, a sophomore.

While some people might find it annoying or disruptive, many students in the class say expressing their patriotism is important to them. They hope they continue to have the opportunity throughout the year.

“I love my country and I really respect those that defend it. So saying the pledge every day is a small way that me and other students can show that,” said Alexi Jones, a sophomore. “I think it’s important that us students take those 30 seconds every day to respect our country and the people that protect it.”

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