FCS annual crayon drive

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FCS annual crayon drive

Sheila Moore's journalism class used their budget from ad sales to assist in the crayon drive.

Sheila Moore's journalism class used their budget from ad sales to assist in the crayon drive.

Alexis Tish

Sheila Moore's journalism class used their budget from ad sales to assist in the crayon drive.

Alexis Tish

Alexis Tish

Sheila Moore's journalism class used their budget from ad sales to assist in the crayon drive.

Alexis Tish, Reporter

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This year’s annual crayon drive ran from Sept. 23-27. Students rushed to get crayons for their homeroom classes which the FCS Club will deliver to DMH for children in the pediatric unit. The crayon drive is led by Katie Warnick who teaches many classes: Foods, Adult Living, and Child Development.

“FCS Club stands for ‘Fun Community Service Club.’ We do community service projects in the Macon/Blue Mound and surrounding communities. Some of the projects we complete are the crayon drive, visiting Eastern Star Home, Trick or Treating for cans for the Blue Mound Food Pantry, Operation Christmas Child, and Secret Santa for the high school staff,” Warnick said.

As the week kicked off,  Warnick spoke about why Meridian does the crayon drive and who it benefits.

“We do this to help the people who stay in the pediatric department at DMH. The sick kids. It’s something for them to do while they’re just laying in bed and can’t really do anything else,” Warnick said. “And because of sanitation, they can’t share the boxes. That’s why we try to collect so many, is because that box is that child’s the whole time he or she is in the hospital.”

The crayon drive is important to Warnick, “I think it’s a really great community outreach. It’s something that we can help people other than ourselves. Even those people we don’t know or maybe we’ve known people who have had kids stay in the hospital, we can help make their stay a little bit brighter. It’s a good thing.”

Warnick said, “Last year, we collected 478 boxes of crayons.”

Last year, the winner of the crayon drive was Jeannine Rude, one of the math teachers.

“I always loved encouraging students to donate crayons for kids in hospitals — what a great cause!” Rude said.  Rude’s class roughly collected 173 boxes of crayons last year.

“It seems like our average per student worked out to be between 8 and 9 boxes each,” said Rude.

This year, the winner of the crayon drive is Sheila Moore and her study hall class.

“Our class loves to give back,” Moore said. “In the recent years, we’ve given to the Cakes for a Cure event. This year we wanted to help with the crayon drive. It is fun to support other groups the way the community supports journalism. It makes sense for us to give back.”

 

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