Child development plays board games with pre-k

Courtney Sollman teaching Pre-K kids how to play her board game.

Ellen Jackson

Courtney Sollman teaching Pre-K kids how to play her board game.

Ellen Jackson, Reporter

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Katie Warnick teaches many classes at the high school: foods, adult living, and clothing when it’s available. Along with these classes, she teaches child development. Warnick’s child development class took a field trip to the Meridian Elementary School on September 25, during the school day.

“I try to [take field trips] twice a semester,” said Warnick.

The students made board games to play with the preschool kids of Meridian Elementary. When the kids were done playing the games, another group of students would rotate and play more games with the students.

Although this has been their only field trip so far, Warnick’s students are looking forward to more.

Gabby Bingaman, a junior and also a student of Warnick’s child development class, said, “My favorite thing about doing these kinds of projects is being able to meet the kids, and play the games with them, and just have time to bond.”

Bingaman wanted to join child development because she wants to go into a line of work that involves children and pre-k. She thought it would help further her education when the time comes.

All the students had different types of games there and almost all of the kids were excited to play with Warnick’s students.

Another one of Warnick’s students, Courtney Sollman has tried to take the class since her freshman year. Sollman said she enjoys the people in her class, and that’s what makes it her favorite part.

“The kids are fun to interact with because they think different than us and like it’s interesting to see that,” Sollman said.

Warnick wishes she could do these types of field trips more often with her students.

“I always feel extremely proud of them when they’re able to take what they learn in the classroom and then turn around and implement that in real life,” said Warnick. “It gives me joy, I love watching their interactions with the younger kids.”

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